Offer Options to Your Customers

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Customers like options. If we only offer one option, a prospect may walk away if it’s not something the customer wants. If we offer too many options, we may confuse the customer and create indecision and cause them not to buy. The same thing happens if you go to a restaurant with an eight-page menu. Sometimes you get so confused you don’t know what to do. In these circumstances I retreat to something familiar, which may or may not be the best choice.

One principle to follow is to offer your customers a good, better and best option, called a GBB for short. For example, offer one unit at a reasonable price, three units at a discount and perhaps six at a deeper discount. Sometimes you can use free shipping to enhance one of these options.

Selling service options can also make use of the GBB model. For example, a heating and cooling contractor may offer a free or low-cost inspection as the good offer. The better offer may include changing out filters, a more thorough inspection, or perhaps provide cleaning the equipment. The best option may offer a proactive part replacement service to maintain the equipment. The goal is to hit different customers with different options in order to make a sale.

Some customers may look at the good offer as cheap and inferior and will automatically reject it. They may be more interested in the better or best offer. Other customers will see the good offer as something they can afford that meets their need without spending more money.

We see an example of choices offered to King David: “Go and say to David, ‘Thus says the Lord, three things I offer you. Choose one of them, that I may do it to you.’” (I Chronicles 21:10, ESV) While the choices offered to David were negative, the principle is the same.  Offering multiple choices to a customer in the form of good, better, and best will increase your likelihood of landing a sale.