Keep the Sales Process Simple


Posted by: Steve Marr in Getting and Keeping Customers on Nov 01, 2019

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When I was in international trade, there were complex processes involved in picking up shipments.   For example,  when a shipment arrived from Thailand or Europe, it meant that someone must to arrive at a port of exit at an appropriate time, board the vessel or airplane that arrived in the United States, clear customs, receive the shipment and deliver it promptly to the customer. Customers didn’t care about how complicated the process was.  They were only interested in that we were committed to service in terms of time and price. 

 

When we made presentations to customers about what we promised, we focused on our commitment to an efficient transit time and affordable cost to grab the customer’s attention.  Our commitment would either meet their needs or not.   

Occasionally a customer wanted a lot more detail that we could provide, but for the most part; the more details we provided, the more confusion they caused.  Then, customers asked for more information about the process than we generally were prepared to give.

Now I have an interest in a damage restoration business. When a customer calls and we make an emergency service call, we understand that the customer is already upset or unsettled. We need to make our service presentation simple and communicate the first steps in repairing the home and avoiding further damage. While we could take ten minutes to discuss the steps we take and the research behind them, I have found it is better to use the phrase, “We will be using industry standards to correct the damage.” If a customer wants more information, we’re prepared to share it.  However, most of the time; they want action; not talk. 

Many times I have looked at a demo for software that might come with a 400-page manual.  Even the demo is confusing to a novice.  When this happens many customers exit the sales process and never come back. In most situations, it is better to give the customer just enough information so that they understand how the software program could help them.  This only entices them to want to know more.  

I have discussed this principle in the past.  I have discouraged salespeople from bombarding customers with a tremendous amount of information, information that is often not relevant at first.